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It's been said that one of the most important elements in growing wine grapes is "Location, Location, Location!” to which many people would agree. However many of us do not fully understand why this emphasis has been placed on a particular region with such tenacity.

Throughout the planet, exist unique geographical ecosystems that offer diverse growing environments, proving to be favorable for growing wine grapes. Varieties in soils, minerals, nutrients, and water tables create the ability for a specific handful of grapes to grow healthy, and showcase different flavor characteristics depending on these locales.

Weather plays a big role within these systems and can be categorized in mirco, macro, even meso-climates, offering the right temperature and wind variability which encourage grapes to grow. Vineyards that are rooted in the windy valley floor, respond to different growth apposed to the high mountain top vineyards due to their proximity of shade, rolling hills, wind breaks, and even electromagnetic pulses from deep within the earth.

The French have often used the term ‘terroir', of which there is no exact translation but is often related to terrain. This term gives us the same sense of place and devotion to the growing conditions that we speak of when we are looking at appellations and regions. Often seen as a mystery why grapes prefer diverse environments, it can be demystified and compared to a household garden. Just as the front and back of a house offer different conditions for plants, so grape vines prefer varying regions display a myriad of elemental ranges.

Throughout the planet, exist exquisite appellations, which are unique in location. Some regions have further notoriety than others, and some are waiting to be discovered and enjoyed. BuyWine.com has a passion to promote and share these regions and introduce people to new undiscovered areas.

In the history of our planet, we are living in what should be considered the greatest wine producing age man has ever known. With technology and knowledge continuously increasing, sharing information to discover landscapes, that perform best, we are rewarded with the fruit of hard work, with years of research on regional diversity. We hope you will enjoy finding wines within these regions as rewarding as we do at BuyWine.com.

Languedoc, France

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 7/10/2015

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Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, Italy

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 6/20/2015

Highly-touted as one of the finest red wine styles of Italy, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano is made with Sangiovese grapes grown around the rural hillside town of Montepulciano in southern Tuscany.
 
The history of vineyards in the region has been traced back 1200 years. In the 1685 A.D., poet Francesco Redi wrote of the noble flavors of the wines from Montepulciano. But it wasn’t until the 1920s, when Adano Faretti began applying the term “nobile” to the wines he made that the name caught on for the full-bodied red wines made by producers in the area.
 
After becoming an official Denominazione di Origin Controllata (DOC) in the mid 1960s, Vino Nobile di Montalcino went on to become the first winegrowing region to receive the elite Denominazione di Origin Controllata e Garantita (DOCG) status granted by the Italian government on July 1, 1980.
 
Leading up to harvest, the grapes are grown in high-elevation vineyards with variations of sand and clay-based soils. After the fermentation process is completed at harvest, the wines are required to be aged in barrels for a minimum of one year and three years in bottle before being released. Reserve style wines are aged longer in barrel. And in more recent years, more emphasis has been put on making more single-vineyard designates and estate wines like the Grandi Annate by Avignonesi, a complex wine made with fruit from the historic I Pogetti Estate.
 
The other popular wine from the region is the Rosso di Montepulciano DOC wines, which are modeled after the Vino Nobile but with less aging in the barrel to preserve the freshness of the fruit.
 
 
Grape Expectations
 
Reds: The main grape grown around Montapulciano is Sangiovese, which is called Prugnolo Gentile by locals. Canaiolo and Mammolo are the other main red grapes that can be used in a small portions with the blends of the Vino Nobile di Montepulciano DOCG and the Rosso di Montepulciano DOC wines.
Wine geek notes: Although it was named after this famous hillside city, it’s important to note that the Montepulciano grape variety is not grown in region. Instead, the hearty red grape is planted mainly in the neighboring provinces of Abruzzi, Marche and Umbria to the east. So rest assured: Sangiovese remains the prized grape of Montepulciano and Tuscany!
 
Taste Sensations
 
Red Wines: In general, the Rosso di Montepulciano is meant to be enjoyed young. On the palate, the flavors are bright and expressive with notes of ripe red fruits, earth, leather, mineral, and supple tannins. On the flipside, the Vino Nobile di Rosso di Montepulciano wines are complex and need time to open up. Admirable traits include elegant aromas of black truffles, violets, ripe berries and licorice; persistent flavors of blackberry, black cherry, plum, black olive, dark chocolate, dried herb; and following through with firm tannins, smooth texture, and a long, lingering finish. 
 
Dessert Wines/Spirits:  Most of the flavorful Vin Santo and Occhio di Pernice sweet wines are also made with Sangiovese grape. Same is true with the local grappas, which are made with the remaining pumice from the clusters used to make the still wines.   
 
 
Food Pairings
The Rosso di Montepulciano DOC is great with grilled veggies, gourmet sandwiches, lentils, pizzas, mushroom ravolis, and grilled meats. To match the concentrated flavors of Vino Nobile di Rosso di Montepulciano, try roasted eggplant, pasta with rich sauces, slow-cooked pork, juicy steaks, and rack of lamb.
 
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Suisun Valley, California

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 6/20/2015

If you're looking for a hidden winegrowing region on the rise in Northern California, then it's time to get to know Suisun Valley in Solano County.
 
Suisun (pronounced sue-soon) is the Native Indian word for west wind. Stretching along the backside of Napa Valley's Howell Mountain to the west and the slopes of the Blue Ridge of the Vaca Mountain Range to the east, this region is located above the cities of Cordelia and Fairfield, at the halfway point between San Francisco and Sacramento on Hwy 80.
 
With a warm Mediterranean climate and a mixture of sand and clay loam soils integrated with traces of gravel, sandstone, shale and volcanic matter, the growing conditions are very similar to those found in the northern section of Napa Valley.
 
The first vines were planted in the valley in the middle of the 1800s. But following Prohibition and World War II, the region was best known for its small farms, orchards, and its peaceful, rustic landscape. In the late 1960s, the amount of vines began to increase. And although it became only the twelfth American Agricultural Area in California in November 24, 1982, the fruit was mainly used in blends made by top producers in Napa and Sonoma counties or bottled under the North Coast appellation, which Solano County became a part of on September 21, 1983.
 
That started to change in the 1990s when a new wave of passionate wine lovers and viticulturalists began planting new vineyards in the region. In addition to preserving the old Zinfandel and Petite Sirah vineyards and popular grape varieties like Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Chenin Blanc,Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon, many of the new plantings included European varietals like Viognier, Verdehlo, Syrah and Tempranillo. The end result was a wide range of expressive wines with lovely aromas and deep flavors.
 
Currently, there are more than 3,000 acres of vineyards planted in Suisun Valley. While many of the more than thirty wineries that work with the fruit are based outside the area; the ones that call Suisun Valley home, like Wooden Valley Winery, Vezer Family Vineyards, Mangels Vineyards and The Scholium Project, have the advantage of being less commercialized than their neighbors to the west. For that reason, the tasting rooms tend to be more relaxed, user-friendly, and the prices of the high-quality wines are admirable as well. www.svvga.com.
 
 
Grape Expectations
 
Whites: Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris, Viognier, Roussanne, Marsanne, Chenin Blanc, Verdehlo.
 
Reds: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Zinfandel, Primitivo, Petite Sirah, Syrah, Grenache, Barbera, Valdiguie (Gamay), Black Muscat, Bernardo.
 
Taste Sensations
 
White Wines:  With gravelly soils coupled by warm days and cool breezes blowing in from the nearby Sacramento Delta and San Pablo Bay, the southern end of Suisun Valley is an ideal place to grow many different white grapes. Generally speaking, the Sauvignon Blancs feature fragrant aromas and refreshing flavors of pineapple, mango, citrus, ripe green figs and vibrant acidity; while the Pinot Gris-based wines are more centered on elegant flavors of the ripe apple and fresh melon.  The conditions are equally beneficial to working with Viognier and other Rhone grapes, producing wines with lofty aromas and tangy flavors of ripe apricot, peach, and white pepper. On a smaller scale, Chenin Blanc, Riesling, and newer plantings of Verdehlo offer fragrant aromas and flavors of fresh blossoms, honeysuckle, ripe melons, mandarin orange, grapefruit, mineral, and natural richness.
 
Red Wines: Petite Sirah is the signature red grape of the region. But instead of being inky, dark and overbearing, the flavor profiles of the offerings from the valley are highlighted with opulent notes of blackberry jam, fresh boysenberry, plum, licorice, softer tannins, velvety texture, and long finish. The Zinfandels are equally enjoyable with notes of ripe red fruits and black pepper. For Bordeaux lovers, most of the Cabernet Sauvignon offerings feature deep, rich and elegant notes of black cherry, cassis, and dark chocolate, while the Merlots tend to be stately with refined flavors of ripe berries, fresh herbs, cinnamon and cocoa.
 
 
Food Pairings
 
For white wines, try fresh oysters, tangy cheeses, gourmet salads, chilled soups, fish tacos and chicken skewers with fruit salsa alongside the Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Gris; sushi and spicy foods with Riesling, Chenin Blanc and Verdehlo; and richer cheeses, seared scallops, fresh pasta with white sauce, and pork tenderloin with fruit chutney are great to try with the Chardonnay, Viognier, and other white Rhone varieties grown in the region.
 
Beyond grilled steaks and roasted meats, the full-bodied red wines from the valley match up nicely with everything from grilled vegetables, Mac & Cheese and wild mushroom raviolis; to slow-cooked duck, quail and gamier meats; and elegant offerings of fine Asian cuisine.
 
 
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Montalcino, Italy

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 6/20/2015

Although it is not as famous as the cities of Florence and Siena in Tuscany,
the fortified hillside town of Montalcino has the distinction of being the
last independent municipality in what would later become the country of
Italy, until keys to the stone-walled town were handed over to the Medici
family in 1559.
 
At roughly 25 miles from the sea, the first wines were made in the region by
Etruscans more than 2,000 years ago. But the real birth of the famous
Brunello di Montalcino style of red wine didn't start until the mid 19th
century when Clemente Santi and other farmers in the area began mastering
the techniques of crafting complex wines with the native Sangiovese grape
grown in the region. For his work, in 1869 Santi was awarded a distinguished
medal for the signature wine he made with fruit from the 1865 vintage. The
wine would later go on to be preferred by judges over famous French wines
and eventually open up the floodgates that would attract a new wave of
winemakers to the region over the next century.
 
In modern times, the interest in the region continued to grow as well. For
instance, when the Consorzio del Vino Brunello di Montalcino was established
in 1967 to promote the region and its wines, the 41 associate members only
owned 71 hectares of planted vineyards. But when the size of the association
expanded between 1973 and 1980, the planted vineyards increased from 261 to
600 hectares. Today, there are 235 members and over 2,100 hectares planted
in the Brunello of Montalcino DOCG.
 
The borders of the Montalcino appellation are naturally defined by high
elevation mountains and the three main rivers which run through the region,
the Asso, Ombrone and Orcia. While many of the best vineyards are located at
various angles on the sloping hillsides below the city, other plantings can
be found around the smaller rustic communities of Sant'Angelo, Castelnuovo
dell'Abate and Torrenieri.
 
With warm days and windy afternoons, the climate in the region is typically
Mediterranean.  In contrast to the more fertile soils in the flatter areas;
the further you move up the hill, the denser and rockier soils become with
large deposits of calcium-rich Marl, limestone, and Galestro mixed with
fossils and stones.
 
By law, a wine labeled as Brunello di Montalcino DOCG must be produced from
a vineyard limited to less than 8 tons/hectare. Once fermented, the wine
must be aged for a minimum of two years in wooden barrels and four months in
bottle, or six months in bottle for reserve wines. The objective is to
create expressive wines that reflect the flavor of the Sangiovese grapes
grown on the special sites in the Montalcino and layers of complexity that
will smooth out over time. Like Brunello, the Rosso di Montalcino Wine DOC
are also made with Sangiovese grapes, but require less time of aging in
barrel in order to be approachable and drinkable when young.
www.consorziobrunellodimontalcino.it.
 
 
Grape Expectations
 
Whites: White Moscato/Muscat. This grape is mainly used to make the
sparkling, still and sweet wines labeled as Moscadello di Montalcino DOC.
Small amounts of Pinot Grigio, Chardonnay and Sauvignon blanc are also used
for blending in the Sant'Antimo DOC, a small sub-appellation of Montalcino.
 
Reds: Sangiovese, the illustrious indigenous grape in the region, is used to
make the classic Brunello di Montalcino DOCG and Rosso di Montalcino DOC
wines. Smaller portion of Sangiovese is for blending with Cabernet
Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah and Pinot Nero in the Sant'Antimo DOC as well.
 
Taste Sensations
 
White Wines:  There are three styles of white wine that fall under the
heading of Moscadello di Montalcino DOC. The first are elegant sparkling
wines, which typically feature fresh, lively flavors of ripe fruits, pear,
roasted almond, delicate texture, and a long, refreshing finish.
The second style are still wines highlighted by naturally sweet flavors of
ripe melon, grapefruit, pear nectar, bright acidity, and a dry or off-dry
finish. The final style is sweet, elegant and complex late harvest wines
highlighted by fragrant floral aromas and deep flavors of fresh cut mango,
papaya, peach, grapefruit, white tea and chamomile.
 
Red Wines: In general, Rosso di Montalcino is very flavorful and ready to drink when
young. Common flavors include ripe red berries, earth, bright acidity, and
silky tannins. In contrast, a Brunello is more elegant and complex with
concentrated flavors of ripe cherry, plum, black olive, sarsaparilla,
chocolate, roasted nuts, mineral, and fresh herbs. The heavier wines have
deeper flavors, firm tannins and high acidity, which makes them very
ageworthy in the bottle.
 
 
Food Pairings
 
With fine cuisine, the Moscadello di Montalcino DOC wines pair nicely with
fine cheeses, appetizers, salads, light entrees, and deserts. The Rosso di
Montalcino wines are fantastic to try with antipasti, olives, gourmet
sandwiches, pizza, pasta and white meats. With Brunello di Montalcino, think
big: fresh pasta with rich sauces, raviolis with wild mushrooms, roasted
game, grilled red meats, and Osso Bucco.
 

 
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Carmel Valley, California, USA

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 4/27/2015

Known for its beautiful landscape, rugged mountains, warm days, cold nights and close proximity to the ocean, Carmel Valley became an appellation in 1983. Running from north to south between Hwy 1 with ridges on the western side of Santa Lucia Highl
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Chalone, California, USA

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 4/27/2015

On the rocky Gavilan Mountain Range, along the east side of the Salinas River Valley, the Chalone appellation is home to the oldest producing vines in Monterey County.

Sitting at 1,800 feet near the Pinnacle National Monument, soils i
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Beaujolais, France

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 7/10/2015

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Valpolicella, Italy

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 7/8/2015

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Tuscany, Italy

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 6/20/2015

Located at top of "the boot" in Central Italy, Tuscany is home to some of the world's most famous wines. In essence, think of it as a magical place where natural landscape, ancient history, architecture, art, fashion, music, fine cuisine and wine are all fused together.
 
Well known for its rugged terrain, the landscape is undulated, hilly and mountainous. Many of the vineyards are wrapped around the steep slopes that are accentuated by ancient stone buildings, olive groves, cypress trees, and forests.
 
Native grapes have been used to make wine since the Etruscans settled in the region from the 8th to 3rd century BC. In the 15th century, the city of Florence became the economic capital of Europe. As the size of the city rapidly grew to 90,000 inhabitants, a large number of prosperous families reinvested their money to develop vineyards in the country, with intentions to make noble wines.
 
Many of the successful renaissance pioneers went on to make their high-class wines with Sangiovese, an indigenous grape known for its dark red hue, deep flavors, high acidity, and ability to produce wines that could be aged in the cellar. However, it wasn't until the 18th century that these special wines were exported outside of Italy. Today, the largest percentage of wine made in Tuscany is exported to the United States.
 
Grape Expectations
 
Whites: Trebbiano, Vernaccia, Malvasia Bianca, Vermentino, Moscato, and smaller plantings of Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc and Sauvignon Blanc in the warmer or more elevated areas.
 
Reds: As a native variety to the region, Sangiovese is the main grape used in classic Tuscan red wines, including Chianti, Chianti Classico, Chianti Ruffino, Rosso di Montalcino, Brunello di Montalcino, and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. Smaller portions of Sangiovese grapes are combined with smaller portions of Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah to make expensive "vino de tavola" wines or experimental "supertuscan"  blends, particularly near the small coastal town of Bolgheri, the Sant'Antimo subzone of Montalcino, and Montecarlo near Lucca in the northwest corner of the region.
 
Taste Sensations
 
White Wines:  When done right, Trebbiano can be light, crisp and refreshing with flavors of melon, citrus, and mineral. In Tuscany, the grape is sometimes used to make Vin Santo dessert wines as well. Currently, Vermentino is climbing in popularity, particularly the fresh fruity styles of wine made with the grapes in the coastal regions of Tuscany. Another tasty option is to try a glass of Vernaccia di San Gimignanco, a special strain of the ancient Vernaccia grape grown near Siena, which features distinctive notes of apple, stone fruit, lilac, citrus peel, and tangy acidity.
 
Red Wines: If you like yummy and affordable wines, then try Chianti or Rosso di Montalcino, which are typically released young to capture the fresh aromas and bright fruity flavors interlaced with notes of spice, earth, and balanced tannins.
 
For stronger, more full-bodied wines, Chianti Classico wines typically features deep flavors of red fruits, violets, herbs, and firm tannins. A fine Brunello is equally concentrated with elegant and complex flavors of ripe cherry, plum, black olive, sarsaparilla, chocolate, roasted nuts, mineral, firm tannins and structure that make these wines worthy of aging in the cellar. And for a more elegant style, try Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, which often features notes of truffle, dark cherry, wild berries, licorice, and spice.
 
Food Pairings
 
With white wines, think shellfish, soups, salads, pasta with fresh tomatoes and herbs drizzled with olive oil, grilled fish and chicken. With medium-bodied red wines, serve antipasti, mushroom soup, gourmet sandwiches, gnocchi, grilled fish and pork. While the heavier, more complex wines work wonders with fresh pasta in rich red sauce, lasagna, roasted game, grilled red meats, and hearty stews.
 
 
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Amador County, California, USA

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 4/27/2015

When the California Gold Rush hit in the 1850s, immigrants from around the globe rushed to the Sierra Nevada mountain range in hopes of striking it rich. Many main hubs of activity were located in areas that would later become important towns within
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Arroyo Seco, California, USA

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 4/27/2015

Located at the foot of the Santa Lucia Highlands between the rural towns of Soledad and Greenfield, Arroyo Seco is known for its fog-laden mornings, sunny mid-days, chilly windblown afternoons. A mixture of sand, limestone, shale, gravel and rounded
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Dry Creek Valley, California, USA

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 4/27/2015

Stretching 16 miles north by northwest from the modern food and wine mecca of Healdsburg in Northern Sonoma County, the Dry Creek Valley is known for its beautiful rural landscape, small ranches, rich history, and one of the largest concentrations o
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Provence, France

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 7/10/2015

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Italy

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 6/20/2015

Long before the country of Italy became unified in 1865, wines were made within its beautiful boundaries for over 2,000 years. Many of the first plantings were done by the Etruscans, who lived in the region which later became Tuscany, from the 8th to 3rd century BC. When the Roman culture developed between 1 BC and 1 AD, new citizens brought winemaking skills with them from ancient farming regions in Greece, Spain, Turkey and Persian.

To help this cause, Julius Caesar and his troops brought back cuttings of grape vines from different countries that were added to the estimated 2,000 indigenous grape varieties already in place. But until the 18th century, most of the Italian wines were consumed by locals or sold on the bulk market. That changed when the amount of exports picked up at the turn of last century.
 
Today, there are more grape varieties grown in Italy than any other country in the world. To help further define the winegrowing regions within the Italian borders, a new system was put in place to gauge the levels of quality of the contents inside the bottle during the early 1960s. The first designation is the Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC), which measured the quality of the unique wines made in different regions throughout the country.
 
The second is the Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG), a guaranteed stamp of approval given to ultra-premium wines made with fruit from small elite regions within the borders of larger DOCs. The wines that receive DOCG status are analyzed by government officials. Upon passing inspection, the wines are bottled with a government seal of approval on the neck of the bottle. Currently, there are over 70 DOCGs in Italy, with the highest concentrations being in the sub-zones of Tuscany, Piedmont and Veneto.
 
In addition to DOCG, DOC and the more generic DO (Denominazione di Origine), wines labeled as Indicazione Geograpfica Tipicia (IGT) represent the typical style of a region that is similar to the Vin de Pays system used in France. In contrast, wines referred to as “vino di tavolo” on the labels are often higher-end experimental style wines which blend native red and white grapes with international varietals like Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah and Chardonnay.
 
Currently, Italy is the largest producer of wines in the world and the largest percentage of export wines sold in the U.S. market.
 
 
Grape Expectations
 
Whites: Catarratto, Malvasia Bianco, Moscato, Trebbiano, Verdicchio, Vernaccia, Vermentino, Pecorino, Greco de Tufa, Bombino Bianco, Pinot Grigio, Shiava, Grechetto, Passerina, Prosecco, Riesling, Gewurztraminer, Pinot Blanc, Viognier, Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay. In addition to making dry or off-dry styles of white wines, some of the white grape varieties are used to make sparkling wines and sweet wines as well.
 
Reds: Sangiovese, Montalpuciano, Canaiolo, Mammola, Barbera, Dolcetto, Nebbiolo, Sagrantino di Montefalco, Negroamaro, Primitivo, Aglianico, Lagrein, Pinot Noir, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Syrah.
 
Taste Sensations
 
White Wines: The best white wines from Italy have unique flavors which reflect where the grapes are grown.  If you like aromatic wines, try wines made with grapes like Moscato, Malvasia Bianco, Shiava, Riesling and Viognier. For brighter, acid-driven wines, try Pinot Grigio, Catarratto, Verdicchio, Vermentino, Pecorino, and Sauvignon Blanc. And for more complex, minerally styles, try Greco de Tufa, Vernaccia di San Gimignano, and Chardonnay from Umbria.
 
 
Red Wines: For young, fresh and expressive red wines, try Dolcetto d’Alba, Rosso di Montalcino and Montepulciano d’Abruzzo. For medium to full-bodied wines with notes of fruit and spice, great offerings can be found in wines labeled as Chianti, Barbaresco, Negroamaro, Primitivo and Cabernet Franc. And for more complex full-bodied wines, try Sagrantino di Montefalco, Barolo, Chianti Classico, Brunello di Montalcino, Amarone, and the higher-end vino de tavola wines.
 
 
Food Pairings
 
With white Italian wines, try oysters, stuffed artichokes, green olives, prosciutto and melon, seasonal salads, tomatoes with fresh mozzarella and olive oil, prawns, pasta with white sauce, grilled fish, pork medallions, and poultry. With red wines, try antipasti, hard cheeses, flatbreads with wild mushrooms, truffle risotto, pasta with hearty red sauce, seared duck breast, suckling pig, veal, grilled steaks, roasted meats, and slow-cooked stews.

 
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Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Italy

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 6/20/2015

Located southeast of Tuscany along the Adriatic Sea, the mountainous province of Abruzzi is one of the largest wine production regions in Italy. The most famous example from the area is Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, a hearty red sipper known for its deep flavors, structure, and balance.
 
As the mainstay of the special Montepulciano d’Abruzzo DOC (Denominazione di Origine Controllata), this special red wine is made with the Montepulciano grape, a unique variety grown in different areas in Central Italy. In Abruzzi, most of the vineyards are located on the high elevation slopes of the Aprennines foothills which receive plenty of sun during the day, as well as solar reflections and breezes from the nearby sea.
 
Within the borders of the DOC, some of the most prized wines are now coming from the small vineyards in the Colline Termane DOCG (Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita), which is located in the hills of the Teramo province.
 
Once picked and fermented, the wines are typically aged in oak barrels or larger barriques in order to smoothe out rough edges of the flavors before bottling. The softer and fruitier styles drink best when they are young, while the more complex wines and reserva (reserve) styles are worthy of aging.
 
 
Grape Expectations
 
Whites: Trebbiano d’Abruzzo (Bombino Bianco), Pecorino, Chardonnay.
 
Reds: Montepulciano, Sangiovese, Merlot.
 
Taste Sensations
 
White Wines:  Known for their floral aromas and light golden hue, white wines made with Pecorino grapes are naturally spicy with lively notes of fresh ginger, coconut, vanilla, ripe peach, melon, mineral, and a hint of sea salt on the finish. Although the regular Trebbiano wines made in Central Italy are typically rich and viscous; the unique style of Trebbiano d’Abruzzo is lean and crispy with vibrant notes of melon, grapefruit and mineral. Same is true with Chardonnay from the region, which is usually aged stainless steel or minimal amounts of oak in order to showcase the natural flavors of apple, pear, and citrus the grape has to offer.
 
Red Wines: In general, the Montapulciano d’Abruzzo wines are smooth, silky, and supple. Some are more peppery, spicy, and rustic; while others are bolder and more tannic. In terms of flavors, the tastiest examples pack plenty of fruit, particularly raspberry, cherry, plum, earthy tones, and long, vibrant finish.  The Montapulciano grapes are also used to make dry pink wines called Cerasuolo by locals, which feature lively flavors of ripe strawberry, red cherry, watermelon, and citrus.
 
Food Pairings
With white wines, try tangy cheeses, shellfish, seafood, salads, pasta dishes with white sauce and capers, and pork with fruit chutney. The refreshing pink Cerasuolo wines are great with fresh oysters, tuna tartare, beef carpaccio, beet salad, and Panini sandwiches. For red wines, try grilled seafood, vegetable lasagna, spaghetti with olives and peperoncino, roasted chicken with herbs, sweet and sour pork, tri-tip, and hearty stews.

 
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Anderson Valley, California, USA

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 4/27/2015

Known for its beautiful natural collage of forests, meadows, vineyards, fruit trees, sheep farms, and colorful characters, Anderson Valley is one of the gems of the California wine industry. Anderson Valley is also known for speaking in the rustic r
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California, USA

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 4/27/2015

There is no doubt that California is the epicenter of the American wine industry. Currently, the state represents ninety percent of the wines made in the United States. And over the past half-century, the state has become one of the world leaders in
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Carneros, California, USA

Author: Christopher Sawyer

Date: 4/27/2015

Stretching between the southern points of Napa and Sonoma counties along the edge of San Pablo Bay, Carneros is known for dense clay soils, foggy mornings, moderate daytime temperatures, and strong winds in the afternoon. Until the early 1980s, the
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